The House Hotel Kvareli in the wine area of Kakheti, part of the Kvareli Estate resort, is a unique lifestyle destination that aims to attract and upskill the local, regional and national creative community, to inspire creative collaborations and to encourage repeated visits to the destination where the transformative power of arts is cultivated.

Key features: Adjacent Vineyard, an Eco-farm and an all-year-long art-focused programme led by the desire to create relationships between the visitors. Influenced by its scenic location and the multiple building components, the solutions of the architectural and interior design aim to turn the place into one of the most distinguished and memorable destinations with minimalist yet sophisticated room design, and common spaces that will be filled with elements based on their function. Every detail in this property is selected with great care and understanding – all related to each other in different visual or functional aspects combining natural materials, accented furniture and lighting that highlights the space.

The team that has been involved in the master planning and the facility strategy plan of the Louvre Abu Dhabi are the consultants for the Kvareli Art Estate – the property’s contemporary art museum.

Once it opens in 2023, this property set in a picturesque forest with a private vineyard and springs will be taking guests on a culinary journey of local cuisine, luxury spa retreats, hiking, walking and sports tracks and facilities like kids club, rooftop yoga and pilates deck.

 

 

 

News

 

Georgia’s ancient wine culture destroyed by the Ottomans

Samtskhe-Javakheti was a key winemaking region in Georgia until invading Ottoman Turks destroyed the region’s ancient, terraced vineyards in the 16th century.

Now, locals are trying to restore terraced vineyards once again in the craggy hills of Samtskhe-Javakheti to replant indigenous grapes and revive winemaking in the region for the first time in 400 years.

Source (BBC): https://www.bbc.com/reel/video/p09x2nvv/georgia-s-ancient-wine-culture-destroyed-by-the-ottomans